bullet   Hainings, Harrowers, Powells, Richmonds, and Related Families   bullet

arrow arrow arrow arrow
David HAINING
(1821–1880)
Elizabeth BOYD
(1821–1903)
George BALMER
(1832 –1910)
Elizabeth ALLAN
(1830 –1911)
Robert Boyd HAINING
(1856 –1939)
Elizabeth Allan BALMER
(1857 –1939)
picture
George Balmer HAINING
(1881–1958)

 

Family Links

Spouses & Children

Agnes Scott McGILL

George Balmer HAINING 3 5 6 7
  • Born: 18 January 1881, Symington, Ayrshire, Scotland 6 7 8 9 10 11
  • Marriage: Agnes Scott McGILL on 26 December 1901 in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland 1 2 3 4
  • Died: 20 October 1958, Azusa, Los Angeles County, California, USA at age 77 6 12
  • Buried: 22 October 1958, Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA

bullet   Cause of his death was Cerebral Hemorrhage (paralysis left side), 10 days; due to Chronic Mycorditis [sic] with Decompensation since 8-28-58.

bullet   Other names for George were Geo. Balmer HAINING and George HAINING.8 9 10 11

picture

bullet  Birth Notes

Whitelees, Symington

bullet  Death Notes

7:25 PM at Azusa Valley Sanitarium, 16244 E. Gladstone Street, Azusa, CA; usual residence 1616 Trenton Avenue, Glendale, CA. Age at death 77 years.

bullet  Burial Notes

Grandview Cemetery

picture

bullet  Recorded Events in His Life

  • Original Name: George Haining (at birth).
  • Renamed: George Balmer Haining (in California).
  • He worked as a Master shoemaker, then Seventh Day Adventist minister. 6

picture

picture
  • Gallery: Birth Record, on 18 January 1881, in Symington, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  • He appeared on the 1881 Census of Scotland on 3 April 1881 in Symington, Ayrshire, Scotland. 13
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1881   HAINING Robert       M     25     Dwelling:  Whitelees, Symington, Ayr, Scotland
1881   HAINING Elizabeth    F     23     Dwelling:  Whitelees, Symington, Ayr, Scotland
1881   HAINING Elizabeth    F      4     Dwelling:  Whitelees, Symington, Ayr, Scotland
1881   HAINING George       M    2 m     Dwelling:  Whitelees, Symington, Ayr, Scotland

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • He appeared on the 1891 Census of Scotland on 5 April 1891 in Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland. 10

1891 Census:  Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland
    Address:  Main Street (Schedule No. 80)
                                                                                         Estimated
Name                Position   Status     Sex   Age   Occupation   Where Born            Birth Year
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Robert Haining      Head*      Married     M     34   Shoemaker    Ayrshire, Symington   about 1856
Elizabeth Haining   Wife       Married     F     33   --           Ayrshire, Tarbolton   about 1857
Elizabeth Haining   Daughter   Unmarried   F     14   --           Ayrshire, Symington   about 1876
George Haining      Son        Unmarried   M     10   Scholar      Ayrshire, Symington   about 1880
Jane Haining        Daughter   Unmarried   F      8   Scholar      Ayrshire, Dundonald   about 1882
Maggie Haining      Daughter   Unmarried   F      6   Scholar      Ayrshire, Dundonald   about 1884
Robert Haining      Son        Unmarried   M      4   --           Ayrshire, Dundonald   about 1886
John Haining        Son        Unmarried   M      2   --           Ayrshire, Dundonald   about 1888
  *House has 2 rooms with one or more windows
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
GROS Number 598/00 001/000 16


picture

  • He had a residence before 1901 in Crosshouse, Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  • He appeared on the 1901 Census of Scotland on 31 March 1901 in Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland. 11
 
1901 Census:  Crosshouse, Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland
    Address:  Douglas Cottage

Name             Age Position    Status    Occupation              Where Born            Parish     Remarks
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Robert Haining    45   Head      Married   Boot-maker (master)     Ayrshire, Symington   598008 8     *
E. B. Haining     43   Wife      Married   --                      Ayrshire, Tarbolton   598008 8
George Haining    20   Son       Single    Journeyman Boot-maker   Ayrshire, Symington   598008 8   worker
Maggie Haining    16   Daur      Single    Domestic Help           Ayrshire, Dundonald   598008 8
Robert Haining    14   Son       --        Grocer's Apprentice     Ayrshire, Dundonald   598008 8   worker
John Haining      11   Son       --        Scholar                 Ayrshire, Dundonald   598008 8
James Haining      9   Son       --        Scholar                 Ayrshire, Kilmaurs    598008 8
Lily Haining       7   Daur      --        Scholar                 Ayrshire, Kilmaurs    598008 8
Agnes Haining      4   Daur      --        --                      Ayrshire, Kilmaurs    598008 8
William Haining    2   Son       --        --                      Ayrshire, Kilmaurs    598008 8
Ellen Haining      0   Daur      --        --                      Ayrshire, Kilmaurs    598008 8
     *employer; working at home; 3 rooms with one or more windows
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  • He resided at Riccarton Road in Hurlford, Ayrshire, Scotland on 26 December 1901.
  • He worked as a Master Shoemaker on 26 December 1901 in Hurlford, Ayrshire, Scotland.

picture
  • Gallery: George Haining, wife Agnes, and first-born daughter Mary, about 1902, in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  • He had a residence in 1902 in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  • He worked as a Master shoemaker in 1906 in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland.

picture
  • Gallery: the Robert Boyd Haining family, about 1908, in Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  • He had a residence in 1911 in Watford, Hertfordshire, England.

picture
  • He served in the military about 1916-1918.

    The attached photograph is a picture of George Haining with other Adventist non-combatants in his unit, along with their 2 seated (and unnamed) superiors.  From left-to-right, the soldiers are:  Arthur Ernest Sanders, Edward R. Harris, Frederick Herbert Thomas, George Haining, and William Charles Harold Anscombe.

    A Historical Perspective

    The loss of life — more than 8.6 million dead — and the horror of World War I is well-known to us all.  Many families were touched by the war, and lost men to the conflict.  However, the difficulties faced by British Adventist soldiers and other Conscientious Objectors is only now coming to light, nearly 100 years later.  Because they were determined to keep the Sabbath and not carry weapons, many were beaten, starved, punished, forced to clean toilets to a shine without equipment, and even imprisoned. Oddly enough, the refusal to work on the Sabbath (Saturday, for Seventh Day Adventists) frequently gave the Adventist soldiers more problems than their refusal to carry arms.

    The intolerance for Conscientious Objectors was partly because, in the United Kingdom, WWI was one of the first conflicts where Conscientious Objectors became an issue that needed to be dealt with in the context of military service.  Other countries had had their own conflicts that developed procedures and a status for CO's that included exemption from service, or service as non-combatants.  For Americans, this happened during the Civil War.  In Britain, however, the army consisted of regular army and volunteers, so it was a moot point.  It wasn't until WWI, when the loss of life became so great that Parliament needed to institute a draft that Conscientious Objectors entered the military.  The Military Service Acts of 1916 and 1918 conscripted men to replenish British troops needed at the front lines.  While the Act did allow for objectors to be absolutely exempted, to perform alternative civilian service, or to serve as a non-combatant in the army's Non-Combatant Corps, this was only if they could convince a Military Service Tribunal of the sincerity of their objection. Unfortunately, the tribunals were notoriously harsh towards conscientious objectors, reflecting widespread public opinion that "conchies" (conscientious objectors) were lazy, degenerate, ungrateful "shirkers" seeking to benefit from the sacrifices of others.

    Sometime after May 1916, George Balmer Haining was conscripted into military service for rest of the duration of the war. He served as a non-combatant.  His unit, and the exact dates of his service are not known.

    George Haining in WWI

    The following excerpt about George's military service comes from John Craven's manuscript The Hainings and the Cravens:  A Twentieth Century Family History:

      World War I presented a problem to British Adventists like George Haining.  Most British Adventists were pacifists and so "conscientious objectors."  By contrast, American Adventists eventually could become "conscientious collaborators" and work in the medical branch of the military.  Their religious views were protected by the American Constitution.   British Adventists had no constitution to appeal to, and British tradition and law only permitted them to be conscientious objectors.  They were roughly treated for their religious beliefs during the war and maintained their pacifism with difficulty.  German Adventists were split.  A minority were pacifists and were severely persecuted by the state and broke away as the Reformed Seventh-day Adventist Church.  Officially the main German Adventist church bowed to state pressure and allowed Adventist young men to bear arms in the war.

      Eventually George Haining and other Adventist pacifists in Britain were grudgingly accepted by the military.  In Francis M. Wilcox's Seventh-day Adventists in Time of War (1936) there is a chapter called "In Prison for Christ's Sake" which Grandpa George Haining brought to my attention.  This chapter contains a series of written experiences (without names given) of British Adventist conscientious objectors during World War I.  He said that the subsection named "Loyalty to Principle Recognized" (pp. 283-286) was his experience:
                     It was a cold, wet winter morning when I said good-bye to my wife and five small children, and set out with a heavy heart and bewildered mind for the recruiting station.  Four hours later, while marching from the recruiting station to the railway depot with a company of other poor wretches, vainly trying to look soldierlike, my heart was greatly cheered by a framed text in the dismal window of a small pawnshop by the way, and an inward joy that remained with me through all the experiences of the next tragic years, filled my heart.  There, surrounded by dusty furniture and rusty tools, shone the sure promise of God, "I will never leave thee nor forsake thee."  It was not long till that promise was to be tried and proved.

                     In the barracks of John Bunyan's hometown of Bedford came the first real trial to me, and I think it will be the real trial to all Seventh-day Adventists who are called to the service.

                     When the sergeant and the corporal who have escorted you from your home town to the army barracks hand you over to the officers for regulation dress and kit, and introduce you as a fine young man and one who has the makings of a good soldier, — quick eye, steady trigger finger, and a brave heart, — and you are dressed up in a fine new uniform and handed a rifle with bayonet all complete, and you courteously decline to touch it, reminding the officer that your papers show that you have been given a noncombatant service, and he takes you by the hand, pats you on the shoulder and says, "Look here, comrade, you're not a 'conchie.'  You don't look like a coward,"  and he calls to all the men to come and look at you, and you stand alone among those hundreds of men, misunderstood, refusing their cigarettes, beer, advice, and finally having the badge stripped off your helmet, the numerals off your shoulder straps (all in a most gentlemanly way), all the pride and dignity you may have accumulated in your church or business life gets a severe shock.

                     I was the only conscientious objector in Bedford that week, and not a chance was lost to make me prominent in messroom, parade ground, or barrack.  Finally, I was put on a train and shipped to Canterbury, and put in a noncombatant company.  I found two other Adventist boys, younger than I, in the company.  They were delighted to see me, and I shall never cease to love those brethren.

                     They told me they were getting Sabbath off, and for some months we did; but one morning on parade our names were called out, and we were marched to the captain's office.  Before entering we were ordered to remove our helmets.  Then we knew we were "on a crime."  Sure enough, the charge was:  "Refusing to go on parade on Saturdays." 

                     At first, the captain was very friendly, complimenting us on our good behavior and the splendid reports of our work.  (I should explain here that we had two sets of officers over us:  the noncombatant officers for discipline and the royal engineers for labor.)  Then he said:  "The War Office has been very considerate in giving you noncombatant service.  Now take my advice and don't cause any trouble about this Sabbath business.  I, too, am a Christian, and when in civil life a strict Sunday man; but now on Sundays, when the enemy came surging on, threatening your home and dear ones, and mine, and the order came, 'Over the top,' I did not say, 'This is my Sunday.  I must rest.'  No!  I went out and fought."   And the five wound strips on his coat sleeve were good evidence that he had done his duty.

                     The other boys looked at me to answer, and claiming God's promise to give words, I began to speak, and said that that was quite all right for him, as he has said it was his Sunday and he could use it as he pleased, but we had no day of our own---it was the Sabbath of the Lord our God, and we could not change it.  He cut me off with a fearful oath, said we were a bunch of cowardly hypocrites, and threatened to line us up on the barrack square and turn a machine gun on us.  We were not fit to live.  "Christians, bah!"  We would sit on our bed all day Saturday reading our Bibles, and if the hospital, full of wounded men, should go on fire or the drains should choke up, we would fold our hands and pray. 

                     "No, sir," I spoke up, "if such an emergency should arise, call on me any Sabbath, and I will clear the drains if it takes all day and night."

                     The next argument was that he was pointed out among his fellow officers as "the captain who had three men who refused to obey orders."

                     I replied that he should not suffer for us, he should punish us by imprisonment or otherwise.  I added that we had nothing to fear or suffer in prison — we did not drink any intoxicants, smoke or chew tobacco, eat meat, fish, or fowl, nor drink tea or coffee..  Prison would deprive us of nothing.  We did not go to shows, play cards, or gamble, and if it would put him straight with his equals and superiors, he could put us in the guardroom on Saturdays, at least, and if he wanted any work done, we were ready for business as soon as the sun set Saturday.

                     He wheeled in his chair.  "Sergeant Major, is this man speaking the truth?  Don't they eat meat, drink tea, or smoke?"

                     "He's telling the truth, sir."

                     "Well!" he spat with an oath, "have all the noncommissioned officers in here at once."

                     They came and stood at attention.

                     "Do you see these three men?  Well, from now on, one-half hour before sunset on Fridays, no matter where they are or what they are doing, send them back to barracks."

                     From that day until our discharge we had no trouble over the Sabbath.

                     Other captains came to the company, found out we had Sabbath free, but their other officers told them the story of our trial, and that ended the matter.

                     Other Adventist men came to the company, and we took them to one side, urged them to be faithful to duty  on the six days, and they need not worry over Sabbath.

                     All noncombatant men are privates.  We had in our company ministers (various denominations), doctors, chemists, presidents of colleges, lawyers, men from all walks of life, but I think the Adventist men fitted in best of all.  Each of us had been trained to work in several lines.  I myself did some electrical,  painting, plumbing, surveying, draining, sewage disposal, shoe repairing, kitchen, and several other kinds of work.  We gave all the service we could with a smile, and three of our officers gave me their names and civil business addresses, and said that if even I wanted employment after the war, they would give me work and good wages.
    Here he shows himself a Puritan idealist able to stand alone in the face of mass disapproval and to explain his point of view simply and clearly and persuasively. 

      At the end of the war he was assigned to digging graves in the winter of 1917 when there were thousands of deaths from Spanish influenza.  He remembered how hard it was to dig through the icy earth.  But when he got down to the level of the neighboring coffins, how black and foul-smelling was the seepage from the sides of the grave!

      Only rarely did he get leave to visit his family, so when his work was done, he would sneak home weekends and arrive at Watford Junction where military police were looking for soldiers taking unofficial leaves.  But his daughter Mary would be watching from the nearby bridge and would signal if the way was clear.  If it was, he would run across the rail tracks and exit the station by the "back door." 
    For More Information

    For further information on British Adventists in WWI, see http://www.adventistreview.org/141530-18N  or http://adventist.org.uk/wwi/ww1.

  • He had a residence about 1923 in Trinidad, British West Indies. 6
  • He had a residence between 1924 and 1930 in England.
  • Arrival: from Trinidad on the steamship "Venezuela", on 21 July 1924, in Plymouth, Devonshire, England.
  • He traveled from Southampton to New York on the SS Majestic with his family in April 1930. 7 Departure:  16 April 1930; arrival: 22 April 1930.
  • He worked as a minister on 16 April 1930 in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England. 7
  • He had a residence in 1945 in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA.
  • He resided at 1616 Trenton Avenue in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA before 20 October 1958.

picture
  • He was buried at the Grandview Cemetery in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA on 22 October 1958.

picture

George married Agnes Scott McGILL, daughter of Robert McGILL and Mary AIRD, on 26 December 1901 in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland.1 2 3 4 (Agnes Scott McGILL was born on 31 August 1880 in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland,6 7 14 15 died on 28 April 1964 in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA 6 15 16 and was buried in 1964 in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA.). The cause of her death was coronary thrombosis and myocardial infarction.

bullet  Recorded Events about their Marriage


picture

bullet  Marriage Notes

St. Andrews Street

picture

bullet   Sources   bullet

  1. John B. Craven, "The Hainings and the Cravens: A Twentieth Century Family History" (mss. privately published in 1995, but it was a work in progress. John continued to update, add content, and re-write his manuscript up until his death in 2014.), Chapter 1, page 3.
  2. Achievements Ltd. to John Boyd Craven, letter, 02 February 1973; privately held by Craven.
  3. General Register Office of Scotland, GROS Data Number, 597/00 0293 (marriage record in 1901 as listed in the SR index).
  4. Marriage Certificate (digital or paper copy of official marriage record privately held by Kirsty M. Haining), 1901 Geo. Balmer Haining and Agness Scott M'Gill marriage record in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  5. Kirsty M. Haining.
  6. John B. Craven, "The Hainings and the Cravens: A Twentieth Century Family History" (mss. privately published in 1995, but it was a work in progress. John continued to update, add content, and re-write his manuscript up until his death in 2014.).
  7. Ancestry.com, New York, Passenger Lists, 1820 –1957 [database on-line] (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36; and Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service; National Archives, Washington, DC), 1930 April 22, SS Majestic, arriving New York from Southampton (departed 16 Apr 1930), Source Citation: Year: 1930; Microfilm serial: T715; Microfilm roll: T715_4720; Lines: 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7.
  8. General Register Office of Scotland, GROS Data Number, 618/00 0002 (birth record in 1881 as listed in the SR index).
  9. Statutory Registers of Scotland, Birth Records, 1855 –1913 (Edinburgh, United Kingdom: General Register Office for Scotland).
  10. Ancestry.com, 1891 Scotland Census [database on-line] (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007). Original data: Scotland. 1891 Scotland Census. Reels 1– 409. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland, Robert Haining household, Main Street, Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  11. Ancestry.com, 1901 Scotland Census [database on-line] (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007). Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1– 446. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland, Robert Haining household, Douglas Cottage, Crosshouse, Kilmaurs, Ayrshire, Scotland.
  12. Ancestry.com, California, Death Index, 1940 –1997 [database on-line] (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Original data: State of California. California Death Index, 1940 –1997. Sacramento, CA, USA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics), George Balmer Haining death, 20 Oct 1958.
  13. Ancestry.com, 1881 Scotland Census [database on-line] (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007). Original data: Scotland. 1881 Scotland Census. Reels 1– 338. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland.
  14. Birth Certificate (digital or paper copy of official birth record privately held by Kirsty M. Haining).
  15. Ancestry.com, California, Death Index, 1940 –1997 [database on-line] (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Original data: State of California. California Death Index, 1940 –1997. Sacramento, CA, USA: State of California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics).
  16. Rootsweb.com, California Death Index.
  17. Marriage Certificate (digital or paper copy of official marriage record privately held by Kirsty M. Haining), 1901 Marriage certificate of George Balmer Haining and Agnes Scott McGill.


Use Control + on your PC keyboard (or Command + on a Mac) to make the text size larger and more readable.
Control - will zoom back out again, and Control 0 will reset the zoom to its default size.

picture

bullet   Have a comment or a correction? Sign my guestbook!   bullet

Home  |  Pedigree Charts  |  Surnames  |  Name List  |  Rootsweb Tree

This website was created on 04 April 2014 with Legacy 8.0 from Millennia and modified by LTools and by hand.
Data on this page was last updated on 26 March 2017.
Copyright 2017 Kirsty M. Haining. All rights reserved.